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"This case demonstrates the risk of significant hemorrhage when a tunneled CVC is damaged at this location and the potential need for the urgent removal of the retained component to prevent recurrence of bleeding" Bogdan and Malavade (2022).

Tunneled CVC associated hemorrhage

Abstract:

Complications of tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) for hemodialysis are frequent, and most commonly include bacteremia, thrombosis, and stenosis. While bleeding is a relatively rare complication of dialysis lines overall, tunneled CVCs may present a unique bleeding risk given their ability to be displaced or damaged as patients have direct access to the equipment in place. Here, we describe the case of a 68-year-old man with end-stage renal disease and neurocognitive disorder, who developed hemorrhagic shock following self-inflicted laceration of his tunneled dialysis catheter proximal to the Y. Examination of the catheter tunnel revealed that the cuff was palpable proximal to the exit site, but the opening was well retracted. In such cases, hemorrhage is particularly difficult to control because the cuff is rigid and poorly amenable to compression, in addition to being difficult to access. This case demonstrates the risk of significant hemorrhage when a tunneled CVC is damaged at this location and the potential need for the urgent removal of the retained component to prevent recurrence of bleeding. It also highlights important patient safety considerations given the risk of self-inflicted trauma in patients with a neurocognitive disorder and a language barrier affecting communication.


Reference:

Bogdan L, Malavade T. Tunneled dialysis line-associated hemorrhagic shock following self-inflicted trauma in a hemodialysis patient: A case report. Hemodial Int. 2022 Jun 22. doi: 10.1111/hdi.13035. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35732603.