Register for citation alerts
"These results demonstrate the robust ability of surface-bound glycoside hydrolase enzymes to inhibit biofilm formation and their potential to reduce rates of device-associated infections" Asker et al (2021).

Preventing CVC biofilm formation

Abstract:

Implanted medical devices such as central venous catheters are highly susceptible to microbial colonization and biofilm formation and are a major risk factor for nosocomial infections. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses exopolysaccharides, such as Psl, for both initial surface attachment and biofilm formation. We have previously shown that chemically immobilizing the Psl-specific glycoside hydrolase, PslGh, to a material surface can inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Herein, we show that PslGh can be uniformly immobilized on the lumen surface of medical-grade, commercial polyethylene, polyurethane, and polydimethylsiloxane (silicone) catheter tubing. We confirmed that the surface-bound PslGh was uniformly distributed along the catheter length and remained active even after storage for 30 days at 4 °C. P. aeruginosa colonization and biofilm formation under dynamic flow culture conditions in vitro showed a 3-log reduction in the number of bacteria during the first 11 days, and a 2-log reduction by day 14 for PslGh-modified PE-100 catheters, compared to untreated catheter controls. In an in vivo rat infection model, PslGh-modified PE-100 catheters showed a ∼1.5-log reduction in the colonization of the clinical P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 strain after 24 h. These results demonstrate the robust ability of surface-bound glycoside hydrolase enzymes to inhibit biofilm formation and their potential to reduce rates of device-associated infections.


Reference:

Asker D, Awad TS, Raju D, Sanchez H, Lacdao I, Gilbert S, Sivarajah P, Andes DR, Sheppard DC, Howell PL, Hatton BD. Preventing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms on Indwelling Catheters by Surface-Bound Enzymes. ACS Appl Bio Mater. 2021 Dec 20;4(12):8248-8258. doi: 10.1021/acsabm.1c00794. Epub 2021 Nov 17. PMID: 35005941.