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"This study aimed to determine the distribution and associated factors of sharp injury cases among HCWs working at a teaching hospital in northeastern Malaysia" Kutubudin et al (2022).
Sharp injury management among health care workers

Abstract:

Sharp injury is a serious occupational risk for healthcare workers (HCWs). This study aimed to determine the distribution and associated factors of sharp injury cases among HCWs working at a teaching hospital in northeastern Malaysia. This was a retrospective cohort study on all reported sharp injury cases from 2015 to 2020. The secondary data were examined using descriptive and multiple logistic regression. Statistical significance was determined for associated factors of HCWs who did not attend immediate treatment after a sharp injury or any of the subsequent follow-up variables, with a p-value of less than 0.05. A total of 286 cases fulfilled the study criteria. The mean (SD) age of sharp injury was 29.4 (5.38) years. The overall defaulted rate for follow-up was 51.4%. Multiple logistic regression revealed a significant relationship between defaulted follow up on sharp injury management and job category as well as the type of device used. Being a doctor (Adj OR 2.37; 95% CI: 1.40, 4.03; p = 0.010) and those using other sharp instruments such as Coupland and drip sets (Adj OR 4.55; 95% CI: 1.59, 13.02; p = 0.005) had a higher odds to default follow up on sharp injury management. In conclusion, although there is a link between defaulting the follow-up and both the work category and the type of device that caused the injury, a deeper analysis is needed to uncover any additional factors and determine the appropriate intervention strategies to ensure follow up adherence.

Reference:

Kutubudin AFM, Wan Mohammad WMZ, Md Noor SS, Shafei MN. Risk Factors Associated with Defaulted Follow-Up and Sharp Injury Management among Health Care Workers in a Teaching Hospital in Northeastern Malaysia. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 May 29;19(11):6641. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19116641. PMID: 35682226; PMCID: PMC9180157.