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"As a result of routine surveillance in our intensive care unit (ICU), we have noticed an increase over time in the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)" Meynaar et al (2022).
CLABSI risk with COVID-19 treatment

Extract:

“As a result of routine surveillance in our intensive care unit (ICU), we have noticed an increase over time in the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). As dexamethasone and interleukin antagonists were later introduced as routine treatment of COVID-19, we performed a retrospective cohort study to explore whether these might be possible risk factors. All patients COVID-19 or non-COVID-19, admitted between January 1st, 2019 and January 1st, 2022 who were treated in our ICU and had at least one central venous line ≥ 48 h, were included. CLABSI was defined according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines as clinical signs of a central line infection with positive blood culture and positive culture of the catheter tip with more than 15 colony-forming units (CFUs) with the same microorganism in the absence of an alternative diagnosis [1]. Dexamethasone dose was 6 mg daily for 10 days or less if discharged earlier. Patients on long-term steroid treatment were not excluded. Interleukin antagonists (tocilizumab 400 mg or sarilumab 400 mg or anakinra 300 mg) were given within 24 h of admission. Central lines were always inserted using full sterile technique. The need for ethical approval or informed consent was waived.”

Reference:

Meynaar IA, van Rijn S, Ottens TH, van Burgel ND, van Nieuwkoop C. Increased risk of central line-associated bloodstream infection in COVID-19 patients associated with dexamethasone but not with interleukin antagonists. Intensive Care Med. 2022 Jun 7. doi: 10.1007/s00134-022-06750-w. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35670819.