Financial ties between clinical practice guideline authors and pharmaceutical companies

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Ensuring objectivity and neutrality is important in clinical practice guidelines development, but previous research shows that authors of clinical practice guidelines may become critical marketing promotion targets of pharmaceutical companies” Saito teal (2019).

Extract:

Financial conflicts of interest in the health-care domain have gained global attention because of concerns that they can bias the judgement of physicians and affect the choice of treatment, having a negative impact on patients [1, 2, 3]. Although financial relationships between physicians and the health-care industry are difficult to totally eliminate, they must at least be more transparent [4, 5, 6]. Therefore, relevant stakeholders have been working to achieve improved transparency in financial conflicts of interest, as emphasized in the Open Payments Data and Dollars for Docs in the USA [7]. Analysis of the Open Payments Data revealed financial ties between health-care workers and the industry, including pharmaceutical companies and medical-device companies. They report that approximately 48% of all US physicians received $2.4 billion as industrial payments in 2015 [8], and the influential journal editors received $28 136 as mean general payments [5].

Ensuring objectivity and neutrality is important in clinical practice guidelines development, but previous research shows that authors of clinical practice guidelines may become critical marketing promotion targets of pharmaceutical companies [3, 9, 10]. In reality, they had strong financial conflicts of interest; the authors of national comprehensive cancer centre guidelines received an average of $10 011 in a year [11]; 81.6% of the dermatology [10] and 53% of the gastroenterology clinical practice guideline authors had financial relationships with industrial companies [12]. Similar databases have been developed in Germany and the UK, which also reveal financial ties between the industry and physicians [9, 13].

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Reference:

Saito, H., Tani, Y., Ozaki, A., Sawano, T., Shimada, Y., Yamamoto, K. and Tanimoto, T. (2019) Financial ties between authors of the clinical practice guidelines and pharmaceutical companies: an example from Japan. Clinical Microbiology and Infection. 25(11), p.1304-1306. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2019.07.025.

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