Vascular Access Conversation - IVUPDATE Podcast from IVTEAM

"The innovative needle-tracking system evaluated in this pilot study has the potential to improve emergent difficult vascular access" Alsbrooks and Hoerauf (2023).
Advanced needle-tracking vascular access

Abstract:

Introduction: Rapid and reliable peripheral IV access is essential for many patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) to ensure administration of life-saving medications, and successful intravenous cannulation can significantly affect patient care.

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a continuous needle tracking system on the accuracy, speed, and quality of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheter insertions.

Methods: A convenient sample study based on the study setting using simulated tissue was conducted with 49 US-based ED nurses to compare the insertion of a midline catheter using traditional ultrasound guidance versus an advanced needle-tracking technology along with ultrasound guidance. The purpose of this evaluation was to assess the impact of continuous needle tracking system. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants involved in this study. All participants were made aware that the results may be published. There was no IRB approval for this study. All sources were properly disclosed within the text.

Results: The addition of the advanced needle-tracking technology significantly reduced total insertion attempts, insertion time, backwall penetrations, and redirects (probes to hit the target vein), while improving image clarity and confidence for participants.

Conclusion: The innovative needle-tracking system evaluated in this pilot study has the potential to improve emergent difficult vascular access. EDs should assess the value of this technology to potentially improve the management of difficult intravenous access patients in their settings.

Reference:

Alsbrooks K, Hoerauf K. Comparative Effectiveness, Efficiency, and ED Nurse Preference Between Two Methods of Visualization for Midline Catheter Insertion: A Pilot Study. SAGE Open Nurs. 2023 Jan 8;9:23779608221150721. doi: 10.1177/23779608221150721. PMID: 36643785; PMCID: PMC9834413.