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"This study will help create elements within existing ultrasound curriculae that will enhance the confidence and ultrasound-performance skills of preclinical medical students" Li et al (2022).

Ultrasound-guided IV access for medical students

Abstract:

Introduction: Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) is commonly used in many modalities of medicine. However, there is a lack of standardized protocol for integrating POCUS into preclinical medical education. Previous literature has detailed the benefits of POCUS in clinical diagnoses and reasoning, but many medical students still lack exposure to POCUS. At California University of Science and Medicine (CUSM), medical students will be exposed to POCUS in their preclinical years. We aim to compare the confidence levels and ultrasound-performance skills of medical students with and without prior videographic ultrasound exposure.

Hypothesis: Prior videographic ultrasound exposure will improve the confidence and ultrasound-performance skills of medical students during a live ultrasound workshop compared to those without videographic exposure.

Methods: Participants will be divided into two groups. One group will watch a 5-10-minute procedural video about ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous (IV) access prior to ultrasound training, while the other group will be ultrasound-naive prior to ultrasound training. Ultrasound training will be led by three other medical students who are trained and approved by ultrasound physicians. After demonstrations, participants will practice ultrasound-guided IV access on a practice pad. Instructors will grade students on the spot on their ability to perform ultrasound-guided IV access correctly. The parameters measured will be proper positioning of the ultrasound probe, insertion of the needle, ultrasound probe movement, puncturing of the vein, and overall technique. The two study groups will then take surveys on their perceived performance and overall confidence levels.

Results: Results from participants will be scored using two measures. Firstly, their self-reflection surveys will measure their level of confidence and perceived ultrasound-performance skills. Secondly, on-the-spot grading by instructors will provide information on participants’ actual ultrasound-performance skills. A standardized grading scheme will ensure fairness among different instructors and participants.

Conclusion: Comparison of the effectiveness of an additional videographic ultrasound component prior to live demonstration will be elucidated. This study will help create elements within existing ultrasound curriculae that will enhance the confidence and ultrasound-performance skills of preclinical medical students.


Reference:

Li JJ, Kim JJ, Tan S, Young C, Park C, Haney M, Nausheen F. Enhanced confidence and ultrasound-performance skills of medical students: A comparative study with and without prior videographic ultrasound exposure. FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.00R73. PMID: 35557296.