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"The first aim of this study was to evaluate if resident proficiency affects the failure rate in CVC positioning under ultrasound guidance" De Cassai et al (2021).
Ultrasound CVC training outcomes

Abstract:

Background: Central venous catheter (CVC) placement is a routine procedure but is potentially associated with severe complications. Relatively small studies investigated if the use of ultrasound is effective in bridging the skill gap between proficient and not proficient operators, while patient safety during training remains a controversial topic. The first aim of this study was to evaluate if resident proficiency affects the failure rate in CVC positioning under ultrasound guidance. In addition, it aimed to investigate the different rate of complications between proficient and non proficient residents.

Methods: We conducted a cohort study including CVC placed by residents at the University Hospital of Padova, from November 1, 2012 to July 9, 2020 comparing proficient and non proficient residents. To avoid bias the two cohorts were matched using propensity score.

Results: A total of 356 residents positioned 2310 CVC during the 8 year study period. Among them, two groups of 1060 CVCs each were matched with a propensity score analysis. There was no difference in the failure rate among the groups (2.8 vs 2.7%, p-value 0.895). Moreover, cohorts had the same rate of hematomas, catheter tip malposition, arterial puncture and pneumothorax. No cases of hemothorax were reported.

Conclusions: We found the same rate of success and incidence of adverse complications among cohorts, meaning that the process of skill acquisition is safe as long as appropriate training and direct supervision by a senior consultant are available.

Reference:

De Cassai A, Geraldini F, Pasin L, Boscolo A, Zarantonello F, Tocco M, Pretto C, Perona M, Carron M, Navalesi P. Safety in training for ultrasound guided internal jugular vein CVC placement: a propensity score analysis. BMC Anesthesiol. 2021 Oct 8;21(1):241. doi: 10.1186/s12871-021-01460-0. PMID: 34625054; PMCID: PMC8499568.