Total quality management and needlestick prevention

"The use of winged metal needles and the incidence of needle-stick injuries are reduced. Total quality management is of great clinical value in preventing needle-stick injuries" Xin et al (2020).

Abstract:

Objective: Based on the concept of total quality management, the practice of managing needle-stick and sharps injuries was analyzed to improve nursing quality.

Methods: Using total quality management, an improvement plan was completed. Standard operating procedures for infusion therapy and monitoring of the circulatory system were made to reduce the utilization of winged metal needles and the frequency of needle-stick injuries. From 2015 to 2018, four cross-sectional surveys were conducted on the use of winged metal needles, peripheral intravenous catheters, central venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, and implantable venous access ports and the status of needle-stick and sharps injuries in our hospital during the 4 years.

Results: Four cross-sectional surveys showed that the percentage of winged metal needle utilization decreased significantly from 13% to 0.5%, and that of peripheral intravenous catheters increased from 77% to 87%. Zero tolerance of winged metal needles increased from 33 to 60 nursing units, an improvement rate of 81.82%. The number of needle-stick injuries decreased from 71 to 21, a decrease of 70.42%. Needle-stick injuries occurred mainly during waste disposal (34.71%) and needle withdrawal (18.18%) and when recapping needles (9.92%).

Conclusion: Based on total quality management, the implementation of zero tolerance of winged metal needles is much better. The use of winged metal needles and the incidence of needle-stick injuries are reduced. Total quality management is of great clinical value in preventing needle-stick injuries.

Reference:

Xin, X., Zheng, X., Lu, H., Yang, Q., Sun, Y., Qu, K., Guo, Y. and He, H. (2020) A study on the management of needle-stick and sharps injuries based on total quality management in a tertiary hospital in western China. The Journal of Vascular Access. July 3rd. https://doi.org/10.1177/1129729820936911(epub ahead of print).

Safety IV catheter