Register for citation alerts

Study of short-term peripheral IV catheter-related bloodstream infection rates

"Our PIVCR BSI rates were higher than rates from more economically developed countries and were similar to those of countries with limited resources" Rosenthal et al (2021).

Abstract:

Background: Data on short-term peripheral intravenous catheter-related bloodstream infections per 1,000 peripheral venous catheter days (PIVCR BSIs per 1,000 PVC days) rates from Latin America are not available, so they have not been thoroughly studied.

Methods: International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) members conducted a prospective, surveillance study on PIVCR BSIs from January 2010 to March 2018 in 100 intensive care units (ICUs) among 41 hospitals, in 26 cities of 9 countries in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican-Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, and Venezuela). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Health Safety Network (NHSN) definitions were applied, and INICC methodology and INICC Surveillance Online System software were used.

Results: In total, 10,120 ICU patients were followed for 40,078 bed days and 38,262 PVC days. In addition, 79 PIVCR BSIs were identified, with a rate of 2.06 per 1,000 PVC days (95% confidence interval , 1.635-2.257). The average length of stay (ALOS) of patients without a PIVCR BSI was 3.95 days, and the ALOS was 5.29 days for patients with a PIVCR BSI. The crude extra ALOS was 1.34 days (RR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.0975-1.6351; P = .040).The mortality rate in patients without PIVCR BSI was 3.67%, and this rate was 6.33% in patients with a PIVCR BSI. The crude extra mortality was 1.70 times higher. The microorganism profile showed 48.5% gram-positive bacteria (coagulase-negative Staphylococci 25.7%) and 48.5% gram-negative bacteria: Acinetobacter spp, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella spp (8.5% each one), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.7%), and Candida spp (2.8%). The resistances of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were 0% to amikacin and 50% to meropenem. The resistance of Acinetobacter baumanii to amikacin was 0%, and the resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus to oxacillin was 75%.

Conclusions: Our PIVCR BSI rates were higher than rates from more economically developed countries and were similar to those of countries with limited resources.

Reference:

Rosenthal VD, Chaparro GJ, Servolo-Medeiros EA, Souza-Fram D, Escudero DVDS, Gualtero-Trujillo SM, Morfin-Otero R, Gonzalez-Diaz E, Rodriguez-Noriega E, Altuzar-Figueroa MA, Aguirre-Avalos G, Mijangos-Méndez JC, Corona-Jiménez F, Hernandez-Chena BE, Abu-Jarad MR, Diaz-Hernandez EM, Miranda-Novales MG, Vázquez-Rosales JG, Aguilar-De-Morós D, Castaño-Guerra E, Munoz-Gutierrez G, Mejia N, Acebo-Arcentales JJ, Di-Silvestre G. An eight-year multicenter study on short-term peripheral intravenous catheter-related bloodstream infection rates in 100 intensive care units of 9 countries in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, and Venezuela. Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021 Jan 14:1-7. doi: 10.1017/ice.2020.1373. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33441207.