Severe anaphylactic reactions triggered by chlorhexidine-coated catheters

0

Intraoperative insertion of chlorhexidine-coated central venous catheters can trigger life-threatening anaphylaxis in susceptible patients undergoing renal transplantation” Ho et al (2019).

Abstract:

PURPOSE: Although intraoperative anaphylaxis during surgery is a rare event, we describe five patients who experienced perioperative anaphylactic reactions during renal transplantation and were referred for investigation.

CLINICAL FEATURES: Skin-prick and intradermal skin tests were done to investigate potential allergies to drugs given perioperatively prior to the development of anaphylaxis, including basiliximab, propofol, cefazolin, cis-atracurium, fentanyl, latex, remifentanil, and chlorhexidine. In addition, in vitro serologic testing for specific IgE was done in patients suspected to have had chlorhexidine anaphylaxis. All five patients were male, with a mean age of 48 yr (range 30-69). Skin testing for all drugs was non-reactive except for chlorhexidine, which was positive in four of five patients (one patient refused intradermal testing). In vitro test results for chlorhexidine-specific IgE were positive in all of the patients. Anesthetic records showed that intraoperative anaphylaxis had occurred immediately after insertion of a chlorhexidine-coated central venous catheter.

CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative insertion of chlorhexidine-coated central venous catheters can trigger life-threatening anaphylaxis in susceptible patients undergoing renal transplantation.

You may also be interested in…





Reference:

Ho, A., Zaltzman, J., Hare, G.M.T., Chen, L., Fu, L., Tarlo, S.M. and Vadas, P. (2019) Severe and near-fatal anaphylactic reactions triggered by chlorhexidine-coated catheters in patients undergoing renal allograft surgery: a case series. Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia. July 1st. doi: 10.1007/s12630-019-01441-5. .

Share.

Comments are closed.