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"The aim of this systematic review (SR) is to estimate the prevalence of complications associated with the use of PICC in NBs" Sarmento Diniz et al (2021).

PICC complications in newborns

Abstract:

Background: The improper handling of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in newborns (NBs) may result in mechanical and infectious complications.

Aim: The aim of this systematic review (SR) is to estimate the prevalence of complications associated with the use of PICC in NBs.

Methods: We will utilize PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and Google Scholar for the databases search. There will be no restrictions on the search for languages, and observational studies will be selected wherein the prevalence rate of complications associated with the use of PICC in NBs has been presented or can be calculated. The systematic review will follow the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Two reviewers will independently select studies and assess their eligibility using predefined criteria. Using standardized forms, two other reviewers will independently extract data from each included study, and the random-effects pooled prevalence will be calculated in the meta-analysis with the respective 95% confidence intervals. The methodological quality of the studies will be assessed using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Review Manager V.5.3.5 will be used for the qualitative and quantitative synthesis. A protocol was developed and published on PROSPERO (Registration number CRD42020211983).

Expected results: This SR will show the prevalence of complications caused by the inadequate management of PICC in NBs, which is information considered important for clinical practice improvement.


Reference:

Sarmento Diniz ER, de Medeiros KS, Rosendo da Silva RA, Cobucci RN, Roncalli AG. Prevalence of complications associated with the use of a peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns: A systematic review protocol. PLoS One. 2021 Jul 23;16(7):e0255090. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0255090. PMID: 34297756.