Vascular Access Conversation - IVUPDATE Podcast from IVTEAM

"Therefore, this study was aimed to assess the incidence, time to occurrence and identify predictors for PIVC complications among infants admitted to Debre Tabor Comprehensive Specialized Hospital (DTCSH), Northwest Ethiopia" Baye et al (2023).
Neonatal peripheral intravenous cannula-related complications

Abstract:

Background: Peripheral intravenous cannulas (PIVC) are venous access devices commonly used for the administration of intravenous fluids, drugs, blood products, and parenteral nutrition. Despite its frequent use, it has complications that can seriously threaten patient safety, prolong hospital stays, and increases medical care costs. PIVC complications are associated with increased morbidity and reinsertion attempts are painful and anxiety-provoking for children and their parents. Therefore, this study was aimed to assess the incidence, time to occurrence and identify predictors for PIVC complications among infants admitted to Debre Tabor Comprehensive Specialized Hospital (DTCSH), Northwest Ethiopia.

Methods and setting: An institutional-based prospective cohort study was conducted on 358 infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric ward, DTCSH from January 1 to April 30, 2022. A systematic sampling technique was employed.

Results: The incidence rate of PIVC complication was 11.6 per 1000 person-hours observation. PIVC complication was observed in 56.4% (202) of PIVCs, of which infiltration (42.1%) was the most common complication followed by phlebitis (29.7%). The median time to complication was 46 h. Anatomical insertion site (AHR = 2.85, 95%CI: 1.63-6.27), admission unit (AHR = 1.88, 95%CI: 1.07-4.02), sickness (AHR = 0.24, 95% CI: 1.31-4.66), medication type (AHR = 2.04, 95%CI: 1.13-3.66), blood transfusion (AHR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.02-0.99), clinical experience (AHR = 0.52, CI:0.26-0.84), and flushing (AHR = 0.71, 95%CI: 0.34-0.98) were potential predictors of PIVC complication.

Conclusion: Knowing the predictor factors helps clinicians to provide effective care and to detect complications early.

Reference:

Baye ND, Teshome AA, Ayenew AA, Amare TJ, Mulu AT, Abebe EC, Tiruneh GA, Ayele TM, Muche ZT, Teklemariam AB, Melese BD, Agidew MM, Seid MA. Incidence, time to occurrence and predictors of peripheral intravenous cannula-related complications among neonates and infants in Northwest Ethiopia: an institutional-based prospective study. BMC Nurs. 2023 Jan 11;22(1):11. doi: 10.1186/s12912-022-01164-x. PMID: 36631864; PMCID: PMC9832806.