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"Our main objective was to assess the feasibility and inter-rater agreement on the PIVC-mini Questionnaire (PIVC-miniQ) in a tertiary care hospital in Nepal" Shrestha et al (2021).
Peripheral IV care

Abstract:

Objectives: There is a lack of data regarding the quality of peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC)-related care from low-income and middle-income countries, even though the use of PIVCs may lead to local or severe systemic infections. Our main objective was to assess the feasibility and inter-rater agreement on the PIVC-mini Questionnaire (PIVC-miniQ) in a tertiary care hospital in Nepal.

Design: We performed an observational cross-sectional quantitative study using the PIVC-miniQ to collect information on PIVC quality.

Setting: Secondary care in a Nepalese hospital. All patients with PIVCs in selected wards were included in the study and PIVCs were assessed independently by two raters. Eight Nepalese nurses, one Nepalese student and three Norwegian students participated as raters.

Primary and secondary outcome measures: The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), positive, negative, absolute agreement, Scott’s pi and sum score were calculated using PIVC-miniQ. We also aimed to describe PIVC quality of care, as it is important to prevent PIVC-associated complications such as phlebitis or catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

Results: A total of 390 patients (409 PIVCs) were included in the study. The ICC between raters was 0.716 for Nepalese raters, 0.644 for Norwegian raters and 0.481 for the pooled data. The most frequently observed problems associated with PIVCs were blood in the intravenous line (51.5%), pain and tenderness on palpation (43.4%), and fixation with opaque tape (38.5%). The average sum score was 3.32 deviations from best practice for PIVCs fixed with non-sterile opaque tape and 2.37 for those fixed with transparent dressing (p<0.001).

Conclusion: The PIVC-miniQ is a feasible and reliable tool for nurses assessing PIVC quality in hospitalised patients in Nepal. The study revealed gaps in PIVC quality and care that could be improved by providing transparent PIVC dressings for all patients and requiring all PIVC insertions to be documented in patient charts.

Reference:

Shrestha S, Vieler J, Haug NJ, Afset JE, Høvik LH, Lydersen S, Gustad LT. Quality of care for peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) in Nepal: a cross-sectional study on feasibility and inter-rater agreement of the Peripheral Intravenous Catheters-mini Questionnaire (PIVC-miniQ) in a tertiary care hospital. BMJ Open. 2021 Jul 16;11(7):e048370. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-048370. PMID: 34272222.