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"Results from our study suggest that extravasation injury due to peripheral inotrope infusion is very low (3%) and it may be safely administered in children at a diluted concentration" Mooli and Sadasivam (2021).

Peripheral inotropes in critically ill children

Abstract:

Many children needing pediatric intensive care units care require inotropes, which are started peripherally prior to securing a central venous access. However, many hospitals in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) may not have access to central lines and the vasoactive medications are frequently given through a peripheral venous access.

Aim: The aim of our study was to describe the role of peripheral vasoactive inotropes in children.

Methods: Children requiring peripheral vasoactive medications were included in this study. We retrospectively collected data at 2 time points on use and complications of peripheral vasoactive medications.

Results: Eighty-four children (51 pre-COVID era and 33 COVID pandemic) received peripheral vasoactive medications. Only 3% of children (3/84) developed extravasation injury, all of whom recovered completely.

Conclusions: Results from our study suggest that extravasation injury due to peripheral inotrope infusion is very low (3%) and it may be safely administered in children at a diluted concentration.

Reference:

Mooli RK, Sadasivam K. Peripheral Inotropes in Critically Ill Children: Is It Safe? Glob Pediatr Health. 2021 May 31;8:2333794X211022250. doi: 10.1177/2333794X211022250. PMID: 34104702; PMCID: PMC8170275.