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"There is a high single device success rate when inserting short midlines for 13-day intravenous pulmonary antibiotic therapy in children with cystic fibrosis" Glazner et al (2021).

Midline catheters in children with cystic fibrosis

Abstract:

Objective: Short midline catheter use in paediatric populations appears to be increasing, however data on success rates and efficacy are sparse. This study aims to describe the success rate when midline venous catheters are employed as a single device for intravenous antibiotic therapy in paediatric patients with cystic fibrosis.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed in a single institution, retrieving electronic medical record data from July 2017 through March 2020. The primary outcome was device success, defined as a catheter that remained functional until the end of antibiotic therapy. Reasons for device failure were categorized in a standard fashion.

Results: Primary outcome data were available for 116 catheter insertions, involving 49 patients and 55 proceduralists. The success rate was 84% (n = 98). Median age at insertion was 15 years (range 4-19) and median weight 52 kg (13-81). Soft, polyether block amide, Arrow® Seldinger Arterial Catheters were employed. Only 16 patients (14%) required general anaesthesia. Median time to failure was 6 days, and median time to successful completion of treatment was 13 days. Six of 18 failures occurred within 48 h and were likely insertion complications. The most common reasons for device failure were occlusion, extravasation, phlebitis and dislodgement. More than half of patients (56%) received antibiotic therapy at home.

Conclusion: There is a high single device success rate when inserting short midlines for 13-day intravenous pulmonary antibiotic therapy in children with cystic fibrosis. These results should be confirmed with a prospective study.


Reference:

Glazner J, Steinfort K, Hu YJ, Browne W, Smith I, Brasher C. Short midline catheters: High success rates for antibiotic therapy in children with cystic fibrosis. J Vasc Access. 2021 Jul 23:11297298211035310. doi: 10.1177/11297298211035310. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34296638.