Managing chemotherapy extravasation in totally implantable central venous access

"This study would argue for the feasibility and effectiveness of subcutaneous wash-out in the treatment of chemotherapy extravasations" Taibi et al (2020).
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Totally implanted venous access is widely used in chemotherapy administration. With over 1 million intravenous chemotherapy infusions given worldwide each day, complications are frequent. Accidental cases of extravasation in the presence of a catheter are rare yet very serious and may require discontinuation of chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the subcutaneous wash-out technique for chemotherapy extravasation treatment.

METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of patients who had received chemotherapy and sustained extravasation in our hospital between October 2013 and October 2016. Subcutaneous wash-out treatments were carried out exclusively, without the application of antidotes or the use of specific antidotes.

RESULTS: We documented seven cases of chemotherapy extravasation. Two cases were treated with antidotes and suffered necrosis in the following weeks. The five patients treated using subcutaneous wash-out had no necrosis and had a steady decrease in the inflammatory reaction of the cutaneous and subcutaneous soft tissues. For these five patients, chemotherapy was restarted within 1 month following extravasation.

CONCLUSION: This study would argue for the feasibility and effectiveness of subcutaneous wash-out in the treatment of chemotherapy extravasations.

Reference:

Taibi, A., Bardet, M.S., Durand Fontanier, S., Deluche, E., Fredon, F., Christou, N., Usseglio, J. and Mathonnet, M. (2020) Managing chemotherapy extravasation in totally implantable central venous access: Use of subcutaneous wash-out technique. The Journal of Vascular Access. February 14th. doi: 10.1177/1129729820905174. (Epub ahead of print).

Safety IV catheter