Management of obstruction caused by precipitated medication in central venous access devices

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The target of this study was to analyze data regarding obstruction caused by precipitated medication or lipids in CVADs and to calculate the efficacy of different treatment methods” Zheng et al (2019).

Abstract:

At present, central venous access devices (CVADs) are widely used in clinical practice. The reasons for CVAD obstruction caused by precipitated medication or lipids are increasingly complex. However, there is no clear treatment program for CVAD obstruction caused by precipitated medication or lipids. The target of this study was to analyze data regarding obstruction caused by precipitated medication or lipids in CVADs and to calculate the efficacy of different treatment methods. A systematic review with meta-analysis was conducted in alignment with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. The PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Internet databases were searched for original research published before 2018. There were 1356 publications initially screened, with one additional study identified through snowballing. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. The reasons for obstruction, except for clot formation, primarily included the following: mechanical complications; lipid deposition; mineral deposition; or drug precipitation. Meta-analysis showed that sodium hydroxide resulted in the highest recanalization rate in lipid deposition, followed by ethanol, and the difference was significant. The efficacy analysis revealed that hydrochloric acid and l-cysteine have similar effects on mineral deposition and drug precipitation. According to this review, the most effective methodology was shown to be the intravenous perfusion of sodium hydroxide in several treatments when the obstruction is caused by lipid deposition. In contrast, mineral deposition and drug deposition are best treated with l-cysteine to recover the patency of central venous access devices.

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Reference:

Zheng, L.Y., Xue, H., Yuan, H., Liu, S.X. and Zhang, X.Y. (2019) Efficacy of management for obstruction caused by precipitated medication or lipids in central venous access devices: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The Journal of Vascular Access. March 28th. . doi: 10.1177/1129729819836846.

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