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Force-activated separation device for IV infusion in dogs

Abstract:

Objective: To determine whether the use of a force-activated separation device (FASD) lowers the incidence risk of peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) complications in hospitalized dogs.

Animals: 367 dogs that were hospitalized and received IV fluids between January 11 and March 25, 2021.

Procedures: A prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Dogs hospitalized and receiving IV fluids for at least 24 hours were randomized to the FASD group or control group. PIVCs were placed following a standardized protocol. Dogs in the FASD group had the FASD device attached to their PIVC according to manufacturer instructions. For both groups, all PIVC complications were documented, and each complication was classified as extravasation, phlebitis, dislodgement, occlusion, or line breakage.

Results: Results from 367 dogs (FASD group = 180, control group = 187) underwent analysis. The proportion of PIVC complications was significantly (P = .004) lower for the FASD group (8.9% [16/180]) versus the control group (24.6% [46/187]). Following adjustment for differences in hospitalization time, the odds of a dog in the FASD group having a PIVC complication was approximately one-third the odds of those in the control group (OR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.63; P = .001).

Clinical relevance: Results indicated that the use of a FASD in hospitalized dogs receiving IV fluids is warranted to lower the incidence of PIVC complications and may also limit patient discomfort, owner expense, and staff time devoted to managing PIVC complications. Further research investigating its use in cats and other species should be considered.

Reference:

Simpson SE, Zersen KM. Fewer peripheral intravenous catheter complications in hospitalized dogs when force-activated separation devices are used versus not used in a randomized controlled clinical trial. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2022 Jul 20:1-6. doi: 10.2460/javma.22.03.0125. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35943928.