Insulin adsorption capacity within infusion tubing

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Insulin adsorption to clinical materials has been well observed, but not well quantified. Insulin adsorption reduces expected and actual insulin delivery and is unaccounted for in insulin therapy or glycemic control” Knopp et al (2019).

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Insulin adsorption to clinical materials has been well observed, but not well quantified. Insulin adsorption reduces expected and actual insulin delivery and is unaccounted for in insulin therapy or glycemic control. It may thus contribute to poor control and high glycemic variability. This research quantifies the problem in the context of clinical use.

METHOD: Experimental insulin adsorption data from literature is used to calculate insulin delivery and total insulin adsorption capacities for polyethylene (PE) and polyvinal chloride (PVC) lines at clinically relevant flow rates and concentrations.

RESULTS: Insulin adsorption capacity decreased hyperbolically with flow rate for both PE and PVC, where low flow scenarios result in greater insulin adherence to infusion lines. When the infusion flow rate was halved from 1 to 0.5 mL/h, twice as much insulin adsorbed to the line. Insulin loss to adsorption resulted in up to ~50% of intended insulin not delivered over 24 hours in a low flow and low concentration context.

CONCLUSION: Material capacity for insulin adsorption is not constant, but increases with decreasing flow. Different materials have different adsorption capacities. In low flow and low concentration contexts, such as in neonatal or pediatric intensive care, insulin loss to adsorption represents a significant proportion of daily insulin delivery, which needs to be accounted for.

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Reference:

Knopp, J.L., Bishop, K., Lerios, T. and Chase, J.G. (2019) Capacity of Infusion Lines for Insulin Adsorption: Effect of Flow Rate on Total Adsorption. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. September 27th. doi: 10.1177/1932296819876924. .

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