Hospital-based CLABSI prevention program

Fourteen CLABSIs were reported in the 17-month period prior to the implementation of the program, while no new CLABSIs occurred in the 30 months following implementation of the program” Conwell et al (2019).

Abstract:

Central venous catheter (CVC) vascular access is common among patients on hemodialysis. CVC use carries a substantial risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), costly events that place patients at a high risk of mortality. Our hospital and dialysis organization developed a cooperative strategy to reduce the rate of CLABSI among hospitalized patients on hemodialysis with a CVC. The program included the use of training and reporting tools to guide hospital staff with CLABSI prevention, as well as leadership committees to oversee the process. Fourteen CLABSIs were reported in the 17-month period prior to the implementation of the program, while no new CLABSIs occurred in the 30 months following implementation of the program. This prevention program effectively reduced the frequency of CLABSIs. Broader implementation of such programs may result in better outcomes and lower costs for hospitalized patients on hemodialysis.

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Reference:

Conwell, P., Aniskiewicz, M., Ghidini, J., DeVaux, L., Perazella, M. and Giullian, J. (2019) A Hospital-Based Program to Reduce Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections among Hospitalized Patients Receiving Hemodialysis Using a Central Venous Catheter for Vascular Access. Nephrology Nursing Journal. 46(6), p.587-590.

Safety IV catheter