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Experience with plastic cannulas in Spanish haemodialysis units

"Plastic cannulas (PC) have shown efficacy in haemodialysis (HD) and are presented as a positive innovation for patients and vascular access survival" Pedreia-Robles et al (2020).

Abstract:

Introduction: Plastic cannulas (PC) have shown efficacy in haemodialysis (HD) and are presented as a positive innovation for patients and vascular access survival.

Objective: To analyse Spanish HD nurses’ experience of using PC.

Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

Methods: An ad hoc questionnaire was administered on nurses’ experience of PC use.

Results: A total of 163 Spanish HD nurses were surveyed, of whom 42.3% had PC in their workplace and 50.9% had used them. In all, 55.8% had received training and 77.9% wished to receive more training. These needles were significantly more available in public institutions than in private centres (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between years of experience and having received training (p = 0.915). There was a moderate-strong correlation (ρ = 0.659) between greater professional satisfaction with the product and greater patient satisfaction (p < 0.001). The nurses would make a median of two modifications in the product design. The characteristics of the PC were rated positively by 55.8% and negatively by 10.3%.

Conclusions: A substantial proportion of the nurses surveyed did not use PC and had not received training in their use. Respondents reported that PC could be improved and a small percentage perceived them negatively.

Implications for practice: Based on the evidence presented and available, if we manage to integrate this knowledge and work on the continuum of achieving excellence, we will continue to grow as a profession and provide higher quality care.

Reference:

Pedreia-Robles G, Martínez-Delgado Y, Herrera-Morales C, Vasco-Gómez A, Junyent-Iglesias E. Analysis of experience of the use of plastic cannulas in Spanish haemodialysis units. J Ren Care. 2020 Oct 28. doi: 10.1111/jorc.12348. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33111496.