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"The novel objective of our study was to determine the capability of insertion skin site culture to predict CRBSI and primary bloodstream infection (PBSI), that include CRBSI and bloodstream infection of unknown origin (BSIUO)" Lorente et al (2021).

CVC insertion site swab and BSI diagnosis

Abstract:

Purpose: Previous studies have analyzed the capability of skin insertion site culture to predict catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). However, there has been not analyzed its capability to predict primary bloodstream infection (PBSI), that include CRBSI and bloodstream infection of unknown origin (BSIUO). The novel objective of our study was to determine the capability of insertion skin site culture to predict CRBSI and primary bloodstream infection (PBSI), that include CRBSI and bloodstream infection of unknown origin (BSIUO).

Material and methods: Observational and prospective study in one Intensive Care Unit. Patients with some central venous catheter (CVC) at least during 7 days and suspected catheter-related infection (CRI) (new episode of fever or sepsis) were included. Cultures of insertion skin site, paired blood samples, catheter-tip, and other clinical samples were taken. Capability of insertion skin site culture to predict CRBSI and PBSI was determined.

Results: We included 108 CVC from 96 CRI suspicion episodes. The causes that motivated CRI suspicion were 20 (18.5%) PBSI, 44 (40.7%) other infections, and 44 (40.7%) unknown. Among the 20 PBSI, 11 (55%) were CRBSI and 9 (45%) were BSIUO. Negative predictive value of insertion skin site culture to predict CRBSI was 95% (87-98%) and to predict PBSI was 85% (76-91%).

Conclusions: The new finding of our study was that skin insertion site culture had a good negative predicted valued for the prediction of CRBSI and PBSI.


Reference:

Lorente L, Lecuona M, Pérez-Llombet A, González-Mesa A, Callejon M, Jiménez A, Mora ML, Madueño A. Skin insertion site culture for the prediction of primary bloodstream infection. Ir J Med Sci. 2021 Jun 14. doi: 10.1007/s11845-021-02685-1. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34121133.