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"Administration of continuous infusion PIP/TAZ appears to be a viable mitigation strategy during small volume fluid shortages" Tschumper et al (2021).

Continuous infusion administration protocol for PipTaz

Abstract:

Background: In 2017, a national drug shortage of small volume solutions significantly affected the preparation of intravenous antibiotics. In response, a continuous infusion administration protocol for piperacillin/tazobactam (PIP/TAZ) was implemented.

Objective: To compare the outcomes of continuous to prolonged infusions of PIP/TAZ in the setting of drug shortages.

Methods: This study is a single-center, retrospective cohort study in a community hospital of patients 18 years and older who received intravenous PIP/TAZ through 2 different dosing strategies of intravenous antibiotics from December 2016 to January 2018. Data were collected for 2 months on patients receiving prolonged infusions of PIP/TAZ prior to November 2017 and for 2 months on patients receiving continuous infusions of PIP/TAZ after November 2017.

Results: A total of 90 patients who received PIP/TAZ via either prolonged (n = 47) or continuous infusion (n = 43) were evaluated. There were no differences between the groups in mortality (3 vs 2 deaths, P = 1.00), length of therapy (6 ± 4 vs 6 ± 3 days, P = .86), or length of stay (9 ± 7 vs 8 ± 6 days, P = .47). Additionally, no differences were noted between incidences of thrombocytopenia (P = .41), Clostridioides difficile infection (P = .48), acute renal failure (P = 1.00), seizures (P = 1.0), or 30-day readmission rates (P = .27).

Conclusions: Administration of continuous infusion PIP/TAZ appears to be a viable mitigation strategy during small volume fluid shortages. Future cost-effectiveness studies may provide information on the financial impact of continuous infusions during costly drug shortages.


Reference:

Tschumper E, Dupuis K, McCrory K, Pitts W. Evaluation of Prolonged Versus Continuous Infusions of Piperacillin/Tazobactam During Shortages of Small Volume Parenteral Solutions. J Pharm Technol. 2021 Dec;37(6):271-277. doi: 10.1177/87551225211034978. Epub 2021 Jul 23. PMID: 34790963; PMCID: PMC8592244.