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"The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with increases in CLABSI in ICUs. These data underscore the need to increase efforts in providing surveillance of CLABSI and implementing infection prevention measures" Hlinkova et al (2023).
COVID-19 pandemic impact on CLABSI rates

Abstract:

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), its etiology, and risk factors in critically ill patients, because Slovakia was one of the countries experiencing a high burden of COVID-19 infections, and hospitals faced greater challenges in preventing and managing CLABSI.

Methods: A retrospective analysis of CLABSI data from all patients admitted to adult respiratory intensive care units before and during COVID-19 pandemic was conducted. We followed the guidelines of the Center for Disease Control surveillance methodology for CLABSI. Data were analyzed using STATISTICA 13.1.

Results: We analyzed the data of 803 ICU patients hospitalized for 8385 bed days, with 7803 central line days. Forty-five CLABSI events were identified. The CLABSI rate significantly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic (2.81 versus 7.47 events per 1000 central line days, (p < 0.001). The most frequently identified pathogens causing CLABSI were Gram-negative organisms (60.20%). The risk factors found to increase the probability of developing CLABSI were length of stay (OR = 1.080; 95% Cl: 1.057-1.103; p < 0.001) and COVID-19 (OR = 5.485; 95% Cl: 32.706-11.116; p < 0.001).

Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with increases in CLABSI in ICUs. These data underscore the need to increase efforts in providing surveillance of CLABSI and implementing infection prevention measures.

Reference:

Hlinkova S, Moraucikova E, Lesnakova A, Strzelecka A, Littva V. Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections in Critical Ill Patients during and before the COVID-19 Pandemic. Healthcare (Basel). 2023 Aug 29;11(17):2415. doi: 10.3390/healthcare11172415. PMID: 37685449.