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"The incidence of CLABSI at the MICU at Universitas Academic Hospital is high. Urgent intervention with strict compliance to prevention bundles is required to reduce the high incidence of CLABSI" Glover et al (2022).
CLABSI rates South Africa

Abstract:

Background: Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are frequently encountered device-related healthcare-associated infections in critically ill patients, causing substantial morbidity, mortality and prolonged hospitalisation.

Objectives: To determine the incidence of CLABSI, median catheter dwell-time prior to developing CLABSI, as well as the causative microorganisms of CLABSI among patients admitted to the multidisciplinary intensive care unit (MICU) at Universitas Academic Hospital, Bloemfontein.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of medical and laboratory records of all MICU patients who had a central line placed between January and December 2018.

Results: A total of 377 patients were admitted to the MICU in 2018, of which 182 met the inclusion criteria for the present study. From the cohort of 182 patients, 16.5% (n=30) of patients presented with 32 CLABSI episodes, with two patients having had two independent episodes each. A total of 1 215 central line days were recorded, yielding a CLABSI rate of 26.3/1 000-line days. Laboratory analysis identified microorganisms in 38 blood cultures, with Gram-negative organisms (55.3%; n=21) being predominant over Gram-positive organisms (39.5%; n=15) and fungi (5.3%; n=2).

Conclusion: The incidence of CLABSI at the MICU at Universitas Academic Hospital is high. Urgent intervention with strict compliance to prevention bundles is required to reduce the high incidence of CLABSI.

Reference:

Glover E, Abrahamson A, Adams J, Poken SR, Hainsworth SL, Lamprecht A, Delport T, Keulder T, Olivier T, Maasdorp SD. Central line-associated bloodstream infections at the multidisciplinary intensive care unit of Universitas Academic Hospital, Bloemfontein, South Africa. Afr J Thorac Crit Care Med. 2022 May 5;28(1). doi: 10.7196/AJTCCM.2022.v28i1.175. PMID: 35784100; PMCID: PMC9235866.