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"Our findings suggest that catecholamine inotropes is an independent risk factor for catheter-related infections in critically ill patients undergoing CRRT" Liu et al (2021).

CLABSI in critically ill patients

Abstract:

Introduction: Previous in vitro studies have shown that catecholamine inotropes are potent stimulators of bacterial growth and biofilm formation on catheter surfaces. This study aimed to investigate the effects of administering catecholamine inotropes during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on catheter-related infections in critically ill patients.

Methods: This single-center retrospective cohort study included patients requiring CRRT in an intensive care unit from 2016 to 2017, who were divided into those who received and did not receive catecholamine inotropes for ≥24 h (catecholamine and control groups, respectively). The primary endpoint was catheter-related infection, including catheter-related colonization (CRCOL) and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI).

Findings: We included 235 patients with 297 dialysis catheters. The catecholamine group had higher proportions of cardiovascular disease (p = 0.002), shock (p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation (p < 0.001), and antibiotic use (p = 0.013). There was no significant between-group difference in the CRBSI incidence (5.742 vs. 3.143 events/1000 catheter-days; p = 0.205). However, the CRCOL incidence was significantly higher in the catecholamine group than in the control group (6.221 vs. 0.898 events/1000 catheter-days; p = 0.006). The prominent pathogenic bacteria were gram-negative bacteria. After adjusting for confounding factors in multivariate logistic models, catecholamine inotropes (OR: 3.575, 95% CI: 1.422-9.912, p = 0.008) and immunosuppression (OR: 2.980, 95% CI: 1.137-7.812, p = 0.026) were independently associated with a higher risk of catheter-related infections.

Discussion: We observed a similar incidence of catheter-related infection with that in other CRRT patients. Using catecholamine inotropes in those patients increased CRCOL risk, which is consistent with previous in vitro studies. Our findings suggest that catecholamine inotropes is an independent risk factor for catheter-related infections in critically ill patients undergoing CRRT.


Reference:

Liu X, Ye H, Zheng X, Zheng Z, Chen W, Yu X. Increased risk of catheter-related infection in critically ill patients given catecholamine inotropes during continuous renal replacement therapy. Hemodial Int. 2021 Jul 27. doi: 10.1111/hdi.12968. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34318564.