Reducing high blood-culture contamination rates in neonatal intensive care

0

We instigated a successful intervention combining skin antisepsis using sterile applicators with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropanol prior to phlebotomy (replacing 70% isopropanol) and staff education” O’Connor et al (2016).

Summary:

Contaminated blood cultures represent challenges regarding diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, antimicrobial use, pharmacy and laboratory costs. Facing problematic neonatal blood culture contamination (3.8%), we instigated a successful intervention combining skin antisepsis using sterile applicators with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropanol prior to phlebotomy (replacing 70% isopropanol) and staff education. In the six months prior to intervention, 364 neonatal peripheral blood samples were collected. Fourteen (3.8%) were contaminated. In the post-intervention six months, 314 samples were collected. Three (0.96%) were contaminated, representing significant improvement (Fisher’s exact test: P = 0.0259). No dermatological sequelae were observed. The improvement has been sustained.

Reference:

O’Connor, C.,. Philip, R.K., Powell, J., Slevin, B., Quinn, C., Power, L., O’Connell, N.H. and Dunne, C.P. (2016) Combined education and skin antisepsis intervention for persistently high blood-culture contamination rates in neonatal intensive care. February 5th. The Journal of Hospital Infection.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2016.01.011

Thank you to our partners for supporting IVTEAM

Share.

Comments are closed.

Free Email Updates
Join 5.5K IVTEAM members. Subscribe now and be the first to receive all the latest free updates from IVTEAM!
100% Privacy. We don't spam.