Nurses’ perceptions of high‐alert medication administration safety

0

The aim of this study was to determine nurses’ perceptions of supports and barriers to high‐alert medication (HAM) administration safety” Sessions et al (2019).

Abstract:

Aims: The aim of this study was to determine nurses’ perceptions of supports and barriers to high‐alert medication (HAM) administration safety.

Design: A qualitative descriptive design was used.

Methods: Eighteen acute care nurses were interviewed about HAM administration practices. Registered nurses (RNs) working with acutely ill adults in two hospitals participated in one‐on‐one interviews from July–September, 2017. Content analysis was conducted for data analysis.

Results: Three themes contributed to HAM administration safety: Organizational Culture of Safety, Collaboration, and RN Competence and Engagement. Error factors included distractions, workload and acuity. Work arounds bypassing bar code scanning and independent double check procedures were common. Findings highlighted the importance of intra‐ and interprofessional collaboration, nurse engagement and incorporating the patient in HAM safety.

Conclusions: Current HAM safety strategies are not consistently used. An organizational culture that supports collaboration, education on safe HAM practices, pragmatic HAM policies and enhanced technology are recommended to prevent HAM errors.

Impact: Hospitals incorporating these findings could reduce HAM errors. Research on nurse engagement, intra‐ and interprofessional collaboration and inclusion of patients in HAM safety strategies is needed.

You may also be interested in…





Reference:

Sessions, L.C., Nemeth, L.S., Catchpole, K. and Kelechi, T.J. (2019) Nurses’ perceptions of high‐alert medication administration safety: A qualitative descriptive study. JAN. August 18th. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14173. .

Share.

Comments are closed.