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"FSD at the time of CVC removal was not associated with increased risk of infectious complications or death due to infection" Waters et al (2022).

Fibrin sheath outcomes reviewed

Abstract:

Background and objectives: Fibrin sheath (FS) formation around tunneled central venous catheters (CVC) increases the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infections due to bacterial adherence to a biofilm. We sought to investigate whether FS disruption (FSD) at the time of CVC removal or exchange affects infectious outcomes in patients with CVC-related infections.

Design, setting, participants, and measurements: Retrospective cohort study of 307 adult maintenance hemodialysis patients aged 18 years or older at a single center academic-based hemodialysis program (UHN, Toronto) who developed CVC-related infections requiring CVC removal or exchange between January 2000 and January 2019. Exposure was FSD at the time of CVC removal or exchange. Outcomes were infectious metastatic complications, recurrent infection with the same organism within 1 year, or death due to infection. We created a Markov Multi-State Model (MMSM) to assess patients’ trajectories through time as they transitioned between states. A time-to-event analysis was performed, adjusted for clinically relevant factors.

Results: There was no significant relationship between FSD status at the time of CVC removal, the development of infectious complications in the multivariable model (adjusted HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.09-5.80, p = 0.76), or mortality from infection (HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.34-2.11, p = 0.73).

Conclusions: FSD at the time of CVC removal was not associated with increased risk of infectious complications or death due to infection. Further prospective study is needed to determine whether FSD contributes to reducing CVC infectious related complications.


Reference:

Waters M, Huszti E, Ramirez ME, Lok CE. Infectious outcomes of fibrin sheath disruption in tunneled dialysis catheters. J Vasc Access. 2022 Jan 10:11297298211070690. doi: 10.1177/11297298211070690. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35001725.