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Directed distraction in children reduces anxiety experienced by accompanying adults

Directed distraction can be useful for managing pain in children and it reduces the anxiety experienced by accompanying adults” García-Aracil et al (2018).

References:

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of a physical method of managing pain and fear in children and anxiety in the accompanying adult during venous puncture in the emergency department.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Quasi-experimental study of 3 groups: one group used a combination of directed distraction by means of a vibration device with ice pack, a second group received only distraction, and no strategy was used in the third.

RESULTS: Pain and adult anxiety were similar in the 2 groups in which a pain management strategy was applied. Pain and adult anxiety were greater when no strategy was adopted. We detected no differences in the level of the children’s fear.

CONCLUSION: Directed distraction can be useful for managing pain in children and it reduces the anxiety experienced by accompanying adults. The use of a vibration device with ice does not add benefits. Fear is not reduced by any of these measures.



Reference:

García-Aracil, N., Ramos-Pichardo, J.D., Castejón-de la Encina, M.E., José-Alcaide, L., Juliá-Sanchís, R. and Sanjuan-Quiles, Á. (2018) Effectiveness of non-pharmacological measures for reducing pain and fear in children during venipuncture in the emergency department: a vibrating cold devices versus distraction. Emergencias. 30(3), p.182-185. .