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"In conclusion, while available evidence suggests that ABCs are effective, safe, easy in use, and cost-effective. However, due to the poor methodological quality of most available studies, more robust data should justify their use at this point" Gillis et al (2022).
Antiseptic barrier caps to prevent CLABSI

Abstract:

Background: Reliable and safe venous access is crucial for patients using central venous catheters (CVC). However, such CVCs carry a risk for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). Antiseptic barrier caps (ABCs) are a novel tool in the armamentarium for CVC disinfection. Our aim was to review the efficacy and safety of ABCs.

Method: A literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, and CINAHL. Primary aim was to compare CLABSI rates in patients using ABCs versus standard care. Secondary aims included efficacy of ABCs in relevant subgroups (age, ABC brand, clinical setting), safety, compliance, and costs. Fifteen studies were included in the meta-analysis.

Results: In total, 391 CLABSIs in 273,993 catheter days occurred in the intervention group versus 620 CLABSIs in 284,912 days in the standard care group, resulting in a risk ratio of 0.65 (95%CI 0.55-0.76; P<0.00001). Subgroup analyses showed similar effects, except for non-intensive care unit. In general, ABCs were safe, highly appreciated by patients and caregivers, and cost-effective, while compliance was easy to monitor. In most studies, a substantial risk of bias was observed.

Conclusion: In conclusion, while available evidence suggests that ABCs are effective, safe, easy in use, and cost-effective. However, due to the poor methodological quality of most available studies, more robust data should justify their use at this point.

Reference:

Gillis VE, van Es MJ, Wouters Y, Wanten GJ. Antiseptic barrier caps to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Infect Control. 2022 Sep 15:S0196-6553(22)00672-1. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2022.09.005. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 36116679.