What happens to emergency department placed peripheral intravenous cannula

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Concern arises when ED-inserted PIVCs are used exclusively for blood sampling because this may lead to unused PIVCs being left in situ after patients are transferred to the wall, increasing risk of infection” carr et al (2016).

Extract:

It has been reported that the peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) is the first choice of vascular access device for patient treatment in the emergency department (ED). The number of PIVC insertions in our Australian ED is more than 35,000 per year. Concern arises when ED-inserted PIVCs are used exclusively for blood sampling because this may lead to unused PIVCs being left in situ after patients are transferred to the ward, increasing risk of infection” Carr et al (2016).

Reference:

Carr, P.J., Rippey, J., Moore, T., Ngo, H., Cooke, M.L., Higgins, N.S. and Rickard, C.M. (2016) Reasons for Removal of Emergency Department–Inserted Peripheral Intravenous Cannulae in Admitted Patients: A Retrospective Medical Chart Audit in Australia. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.April 1st. [epub ahead of print].

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2016.70

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