Trends in rates of central line-associated bloodstream infection

0

…the National and State Healthcare–Associated Infections Progress Report has shown that CLABSI rates declined by 50% between 2008 and 2014” O’Grady (2017).

Abstract:

Reports suggest that rates of central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) have steadily decreased over the past 2 decades. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a 58% decline in CLABSI rates from 2001 to 2009 across intensive care units (1); a decrease was noted between 2004 and 2013 in hospitals participating in the Michigan Keystone Project (2); and the National and State Healthcare–Associated Infections Progress Report has shown that CLABSI rates declined by 50% between 2008 and 2014. Although encouraging, a fundamental question remains: Why have we been so successful at reducing CLABSI but not other health care–associated infections, such as surgical site or catheter-associated urinary tract infections? Are the newsworthy reductions in CLABSI rates credible?

Reference:

O’Grady, N.P. (2017) Annals for Hospitalists Inpatient Notes – Trends in Rates of Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection—Zeroing In on Zero or Just Fake News? Annals of Internal Medicine. 167(12), p.HO2-HO3.

DOI: 10.7326/M17-3049

Thank you to our partners for supporting IVTEAM

Share.

Comments are closed.