Trapezius placement of totally implantable vascular access devices

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This article follows on from a previous discussion of the benefits of this approach, which illustrated and examined clinical outcomes of trapezius-placement versus anterior chest wall placed ports, for patients with metastatic subcutaneous disease on the anterior chest wall” Hill (2016).

Abstract:

Totally implantable vascular access devices (TIVADs) are indicated for intermittent long-term intravenous access. It is widely accepted within medical literature that TIVADs are associated with statistically significant lower infection rates than other central venous access devices. Typical sites for implantation are on the anterior chest wall, using the internal jugular, axillary, cephalic or a subclavian vein.

This article follows on from a previous discussion of the benefits of this approach, which illustrated and examined clinical outcomes of trapezius-placement versus anterior chest wall placed ports, for patients with metastatic subcutaneous disease on the anterior chest wall. The procedure provides a unique challenge for the clinician. This article focuses on the process of trapezius port implantation, providing an illustrative guide to understand the procedure. Trapezius port placement is a viable option for patients for whom routine sites are excluded and who require long-term intermittent vascular access.

Reference:

Hill, S. (2016) Trapezius placement of implanted ports: understanding the procedure. British Journal of Nursing. 25(Sup2), p.S9-S15.

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