Ten year outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy review from Australia

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This study reviewed the practice of an OPAT service in a large Australian tertiary teaching hospital in Western Sydney over a 10-year period” Li et al (2018).

Abstract:

PURPOSE: Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) is a widely accepted and safe therapeutic option for carefully selected patients. This study reviewed the practice of an OPAT service in a large Australian tertiary teaching hospital in Western Sydney over a 10-year period.

METHOD: Data were retrieved from a prospectively maintained electronic database which included information on patient demographics, clinical diagnosis, microbiological identity, antimicrobial therapy, complications and readmissions. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics.

RESULTS: There were 3435 referrals made to the service between January 2004 and June 2014, amounting to 25,289 antibiotic days. The most frequent referral was for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections (SSTIs), 61.28%, followed by Bone and Joint Infections (BJIs), 15.30%. The most common organism identified was methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Readmission was uncommon (5.15%), with the highest rate of readmission noted for Cardiovascular System Infections (16.67%) followed by BJIs (10.31%). Line infection, aseptic thrombophlebitis and drug hypersensitivity or reaction were the cause of 68.55% of all complications. There was a decline in line-related complications throughout the study period.

CONCLUSION: OPAT service is in increasing demand in Australia, providing a significant relief in in-hospital days. Growth in referrals was seen not only with SSTIs and BJIs, but also a diverse range of other infective entities with limited literature in its treatment in an OPAT setting. This study highlights the need to improve data collection, develop risk stratification strategies and standardisation of OPAT services in Australia.

Reference:

Li, W., Branley, J. and Sud, A. (2018) Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy in a suburban tertiary referral centre in Australia over 10 years. Infection. February 20th. .

doi: 10.1007/s15010-018-1126-4.

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