Sharps injury surveillance systems reviewed in this article

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The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens Standard as amended by the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act requiring the use of safety-engineered medical devices to prevent needlesticks and sharps injuries has been in place since 2001” Mitchell et al (2017).

Abstract:

The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens Standard as amended by the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act requiring the use of safety-engineered medical devices to prevent needlesticks and sharps injuries has been in place since 2001. Injury changes over time include differences between those from non-safety compared to safety-engineered medical devices. This research compares 2 US occupational incident surveillance systems to determine if these data can be generalized to other facilities and other countries either with legislation in place or considering developing national policies for the prevention of sharps injuries among healthcare personnel.

Reference:

Mitchell, A.H., Parker, G.B., Kanamori, H., Rutala, W.A. and Weber, D.J. (2017) Comparing Non-Safety to Safety Device Sharps Injury Incidence Data from Two Different Occupational Surveillance Systems. The Journal of Hospital Infection. February 26th. [epub ahead of print].

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2017.02.021

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