Self-reporting instrument for coping with needle-related procedures

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The aim of this study was to determine the concurrent and content validity, sensitivity and inter-rater reliability of the Faces Emotional Coping Scale (FECS) to evaluate the children’s anticipation of the level of emotional coping in conjunction with a venepuncture” Nilsson et al (2017).

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to determine the concurrent and content validity, sensitivity and inter-rater reliability of the Faces Emotional Coping Scale (FECS) to evaluate the children’s anticipation of the level of emotional coping in conjunction with a venepuncture. A total of 153 children with type 1 diabetes and 86 of their parents participated in the study. The age of the children, 76 of whom were boys, ranged from 7 to 18 years. The child and his or her parent reported the child’s coping ability, and the child reported the pain intensity and unpleasantness of a venepuncture. The child also wrote a short narrative about his or her experience of the needle procedure. The FECS correlated negatively with the Coloured Analogue Scale and the Facial Affective Scale and positively with the FECS by proxy. The narratives of 90 children correlated negatively with the FECS. Younger children reported significantly lower scores than older children did regarding their ability to cope with a venepuncture. The children’s scores on the FECS showed good agreement with the parents’ scores. In this study, the FECS was deemed valid for measuring children’s ability to cope with their emotions when undergoing needle-related procedures like venepuncture.

Reference:

Nilsson, S., Hanberger, L., Olinder, A.L. and Forsner, M. (2017) The Faces Emotional Coping Scale as a self-reporting instrument for coping with needle-related procedures: An initial validation study with children treated for type 1 diabetes. Journal of Child Health Care. 21(4), p.392-403.

doi: 10.1177/1367493517729041.

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