Review of fifty years of long-term central venous access

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Critical issues include catheter-related infections, venous injury, thrombosis, chronic inflammation, fibrosis, occlusion, and progressive attrition of central venous capital” Baskin et al (2018).

Abstract:

Fifty years ago, the first central venous access devices (CVADs) intended for long-term use were used to deliver parenteral nutrition (1). The index patient required 16 catheters in 5 different locations over her first 22 months of life, encountering a range of clinical issues that remain prevalent today. Critical issues include catheter-related infections, venous injury, thrombosis, chronic inflammation, fibrosis, occlusion, and progressive attrition of central venous capital. The frequency and severity of these complications remain core issues that differentiate patients who require chronic venous access from those whose access needs are acute, temporary, or occasional.

Reference:

Baskin, K.M., Durack, J.C., Abu-Elmagd, K., Doellman, D., Drews, B.B., Journeycake, J.M., Kocoshis, S.A., McLennan, G., Rupp, S.M., Towbin, R.B., Wasse, H., Mermel, L.A., Toomay, S.M., Camillus, J.C., Ahrar, K. and White, S.B. (2018) Chronic Central Venous Access: From Research Consensus Panel to National Multistakeholder Initiative. Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. February 15th. .

doi: 10.1016/j.jvir.2017.12.009.

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