Review of achieving safe femoral arterial access

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“Measures to decrease vascular access complications include proper technique, optimal pharmacotherapy, and avoiding the use of arterial sheaths >6 Fr” Lee and Kong (2015).

Reference:

Lee, M.S. and Kong, J. (2015) Achieving Safe Femoral Arterial Access. Current Cardiology Reports. 17(6), p.596.

Abstract:

Percutaneous coronary intervention can lead to vascular access complications that prolong patient hospital stay and costs as well as increase patient morbidity and mortality. Given its ease of use and familiarity, transfemoral access is still the preferred method of approach by many operators. The transfemoral approach is used when large bore access is required or if transradial access is not feasible due to variations in the anatomy of the upper extremity artery. The use of fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, and femoral angiography can help the operator obtain proper arteriotomy of the common femoral artery. Measures to decrease vascular access complications include proper technique, optimal pharmacotherapy, and avoiding the use of arterial sheaths >6 Fr. Optimal pharmacotherapy includes the use of bivalirudin and weight-based unfractionated heparin to avoid supratherapeutic activated clotting times, and to avoid glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. When used appropriately, vascular closure devices can decrease the risk of bleeding complications. Randomized trials are needed to confirm these recommendations.

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