Relationship between alterations in intestinal microbiota and central line infections

0

Marked alterations of the intestinal microbiota with decreased level of acetate were shown in SBS patients compared with healthy controls. Over-abundance of Proteobacteria (especially Enterobacteriaceae) was found in the samples from the PNALD and CLABSI Groups” Wang et al (2017).

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The gut microbiota plays a vital role in modulating the metabolic and immune functions of the intestines. We aimed to analyze the dysbiosis of microbiota in infants with short bowel syndrome (SBS) with different complications.

PROCEDURE: We included 26 fecal samples from 18 infants with SBS during parenteral nutrition. The samples were categorized into three groups: asymptomatic, parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD), and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Seven healthy infants were enrolled as controls. Fecal microbiota, secretory IgA, calprotectin, bile acids, and short chain fatty acids were detected.

RESULTS: The bacterial diversity of the Asymptomatic and Control Groups was significantly higher than that in the PNALD and CLABSI Groups. Proteobacteria was the most pronounced phylum in the PNALD and CLABSI Groups. Decreased acetate was observed in all SBS samples; however, fecal secretory IgA and calprotectin and the proportion of primary and secondary bile acids did not differ from those in healthy controls.

CONCLUSIONS: Marked alterations of the intestinal microbiota with decreased level of acetate were shown in SBS patients compared with healthy controls. Over-abundance of Proteobacteria (especially Enterobacteriaceae) was found in the samples from the PNALD and CLABSI Groups.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognosis Study, Level I.

Reference:

Wang, P., Wang, Y., Lu, L., Yan, W., Tao, Y., Zhou, K., Jia, J. and Cai, W. (2017) Alterations in intestinal microbiota relate to intestinal failure-associated liver disease and central line infections. Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2May 3rd. [Epub ahead of print]

doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2017.04.020.

Thank you to our partners for supporting IVTEAM

Other stories

Loading…

Share.

Comments are closed.

Free Email Updates
Join 5.5K IVTEAM members. Subscribe now and be the first to receive all the latest free updates from IVTEAM!
100% Privacy. We don't spam.