Problems associated with intravenous drug administration

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“Infusion therapy through intravenous (IV) access is a therapeutic option used in the treatment of many hospitalized patients. IV therapy is complex, potentially dangerous and error prone. The objectives were to ascertain the drug-related problems (DRPs) involved in IV medication administration and further to develop strategies to reduce and prevent the occurrence of DRPs during IV administration.” Vijayakumar et al (2014).

Reference:

Vijayakumar, A., Sharon, E.V., Teena, J., Nobil, S. and Nazeer, I. (2014) A clinical study on drug-related problems associated with intravenous drug administration. Journal of Basic and Clinical Pharmacy. 5(2), p.49-53.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Infusion therapy through intravenous (IV) access is a therapeutic option used in the treatment of many hospitalized patients. IV therapy is complex, potentially dangerous and error prone. The objectives were to ascertain the drug-related problems (DRPs) involved in IV medication administration and further to develop strategies to reduce and prevent the occurrence of DRPs during IV administration.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective observational study was carried out for a period of 4 months. Patients receiving more than two medications through IV route were included and studied.

RESULTS: Of 110 patients, 76 (69.09%) were male and the rest were female. Nearly, half of the patients (46.3%, n = 51) were reported with DRPs. Of the 80 DRPs (72.72%) documented, 61 problems (55.4%) were seen in patients given IV medications through peripheral line. Among the DRPs majority seen were incompatibilities (40.9%, n = 45), followed by complications developed (12.7%, n = 14), errors in rate of administration (10.9%), and dilution errors (8%). To study the association of DRPs among gender, statistical analysis was performed and significant association was seen between DRPs and gender (P = 0.03).

CONCLUSION: Among the reported DRPs, simultaneous IV administration of two incompatible drugs was the main predicament faced.

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