Peripheral intravenous cannulation associated anxiety

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“Nurses can play a valuable role in minimising the associated physical discomfort and complications that patients may experience as a result of having a peripheral cannula inserted.” McGowan (2014).

Reference:

McGowan, D. (2014) Peripheral intravenous cannulation: managing distress and anxiety. British Journal of Nursing. 23(Suppl 19), p.S4-9.

Abstract:

It is recognised that peripheral intravenous (IV) cannulation is an increasingly performed procedure within the hospital setting. This invasive, yet necessary, procedure often causes patients considerable anxiety and distress, especially those patients who have to endure multiple and possibly painful and difficult cannulations. Nurses can play a valuable role in minimising the associated physical discomfort and complications that patients may experience as a result of having a peripheral cannula inserted through maintaining their knowledge and skills in relation to patient preparation, assessment and the care and management of the cannula. However, nurses also play an equally valuable role in recognising the potential psychological complications that are associated with peripheral IV cannulation. Demonstrating a knowledge and understanding of the effective methods that are used to manage and minimise these complications can ensure patients’ confidence is maintained and their experience of cannulation is positive.

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