Pain and distress perceived by patients during PICC placement

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“…evaluate distress and pain perceived by patients during the positioning of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) or midline catheter, both in the home and hospice settings” Bortolussi et al (2015).

Reference:

Bortolussi, R., Zotti, P., Conte, M., Marson, R., Polesel, J., Colussi, A., Piazza, D., Tabaro, G. and Spazzapan, S. (2015) Quality of Life, Pain Perception and Distress Correlated to Ultrasound-Guided Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters in Palliative Care Patients in a Home or Hospice Setting. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. April 16th. [epub ahead of print].

Abstract:

CONTEXT: To evaluate distress and pain perceived by patients during the positioning of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) or midline catheter, both in the home and hospice settings.

METHODS: This was a prospective observational study performed by the Palliative Care Network of Pordenone. In addition to evaluating distress and pain, we monitored patient quality of life and the devices used. Quality of life was measured with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Core 15-Palliative scale (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL).

RESULTS: From May 2012 to July 2013, 48 patients were enrolled in the study. The level of distress during the procedure was null or very low in 95.8% of the patients, and completely absent after one week. Pain during insertion was null or very little in 93.8% of the patients, and zero after one week in 98% of the patients. Quality of life was significantly improved after one week for certain specific parameters and also globally. The number of catheter days monitored was 3097. The weekly monitoring of the devices revealed a series of minor complications. Only two catheters were removed for serious complications.

CONCLUSION: Our results showed a low impact on pain and distress, a low level of local and systemic complications and a favorable impact on patients’ quality of life. However, other studies are necessary to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the use of these devices and their role in palliative care.

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