Multi-disciplinary vascular access care and access outcomes in hemodialysis patients

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Fistulas, the preferred form of hemodialysis access, are difficult to establish and maintain. We examined the effect of a multidisciplinary vascular access team, including nurses, surgeons, and radiologists, on the probability of using a fistula catheter-free, and rates of access-related procedures in incident patients receiving hemodialysis.

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DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We examined vascular access outcomes in the first year of hemodialysis treatment before (2004-2005, preteam period) and after the implementation of an access team (2006-2008, early-team period; 2009-2011, late-team period) in the Calgary Health Region, Canada. We used logistic regression to study the probability of fistula creation and the probability of catheter-free fistula use, and negative binomial regression to study access-related procedure rates.

RESULTS: We included 609 adults (mean age, 65 [±15] years; 61% men; 54% with diabetes). By the end of the first year of hemodialysis, 102 participants received a fistula in the preteam period (70%), 196 (78%) in the early-team period (odds ratios versus preteam, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 2.35), and 139 (66%) in the late-team period (0.85; 0.54 to 1.35). Access team implementation did not affect the probability of catheter-free use of the fistula (odds ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.52 to 1.43, for the early; and 0.89; 0.52 to 1.53, for the late team versus preteam period). Participants underwent an average of 4-5 total access-related procedures during the first year of hemodialysis, with higher rates in women and in people with comorbidities. Catheter-related procedure rates were similar before and after team implementation; relative to the preteam period, fistula-related procedure rates were 40% (20%-60%) and 30% (10%-50%) higher in the early-team and late-team periods, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Introduction of a multidisciplinary access team did not increase the probability of catheter-free fistula use, but resulted in higher rates of fistula-related procedures.

Reference:

Gill, S., Quinn, R., Oliver, M., Kamar, F., Kabani, R., Devoe, D., Mysore, P., Pannu, N., MacRae, J., Manns, B., Hemmelgarn, B., James, M., Tonelli, M., Lewin, A., Liu, P. and Ravani, P. (2017) Multi-Disciplinary Vascular Access Care and Access Outcomes in People Starting Hemodialysis Therapy. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. September 14th. .

doi: 10.2215/CJN.03430317.

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