Investing in vascular access and infusion therapy equipment

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Senior managers must understand what they have invested in and how it enhances patient care, improves efficiency and saves money in order to be persuaded to continue to invest in and develop IV services” Oliver (2016).

Extract:

“Perhaps the key to starting or maintaining an IV service is through audit. What are we doing well? What are the problems? How can we improve? It is important that IV access services are not just seen simply as cannula inserters (Jackson, 2007) and that policy makers are fully aware of the impact the service has on patient care.

For example, obtaining an appropriate central line early for septic patients improves survival (Prescott and Cooke, 2013), placing an appropriate line quickly for a patient for home IV therapy will enable them to be discharged more quickly and reduce inpatient bed days/costs (Chapman et al, 2012), and putting a PICC in a patient for chemotherapy will stop potentially costly breaches in a patient’s chemotherapy pathways. But is this understood by senior management? Senior managers must understand what they have invested in and how it enhances patient care, improves efficiency and saves money in order to be persuaded to continue to invest in and develop IV services.” Oliver (2016).

Reference:

Oliver, G. (2016) Investing in IV access services. British Journal of Nursing. 25(Sup2), p.S3.

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