Hypodermoclysis efficacy in hydration against the intravenous (IV) route in elderly patients

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“The objective of the present study is to evaluate the subcutaneous non-inferiority efficacy in hydration against the intravenous (IV) route in elderly patients with dehydration.”  Duems Noriega and Ariño Blasco (2014).

Reference:

Duems Noriega, O. and Ariño Blasco, S. (2014) Efficacy of the subcutaneous route compared to intravenous hydration in the elderly hospitalised patient: A randomised controlled study. Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología. January 28th. . .

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: The subcutaneous (SC) route has recently emerged as a rehydration method with potential advantages in the geriatric population. Nevertheless, little is known about its application during hospitalization. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the subcutaneous non-inferiority efficacy in hydration against the intravenous (IV) route in elderly patients with dehydration.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective, randomized and controlled interventional trial of patients 65 years and older admitted to an Acute Geriatric Unit with mild to moderate dehydration and oral intolerance, evaluating the non-inferiority of subcutaneous fluid therapy versus the intravenous route. The intervention consisted of the administration of up to 1.5 l/day/route for 72 hours subcutaneous vs. intravenous, evaluating the variations in biochemical parameters (urea, creatinine, osmolarity), clinical outcome, and route related complications.

RESULTS: Sixty seven patients completed the study (34 SC, age 86.4±8.5 years, 41% women, vs. 33 IV, 84.3±6.6, 54.5% women, with no significant differences). The amount of fluid administered per day by route was 1.320 ml±400 SC vs. 1.480 ml±340 IV, P=.092. During follow similar reductions were observed between groups without any statistical significance, with mean differences pre-postintervention of urea (49.6±52.3 SC vs. 50.3±52.3 IV, P=.96); creatinine (0.68±0.66 SC vs. 0.60±0.49 IV, P=.58), and osmolarity (15.6±24.4 SC vs. 21.1±31 IV, P=.43). Fewer catheter extraction episodes were observed in the SC group, which also was the group most prone to peri-clysis edema.

CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of subcutaneous rehydration in elderly hospitalized patients with mild-moderate dehydration is not inferior to that obtained intravenously, and may even have additional advantages.

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