How to manage a calcium chloride infusion extravasation injury

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The reported incidence of extravasation among hospital inpatients varies between 0.1% and 6.5%, but true incidence is likely higher because of inconsistent documentation and under‐reporting” Xu et al (2016).

Extract:

“Intravenous fluid extravasation is the inadvertent administration of a drug or intravenous (IV) fluid into the surrounding tissue instead of into the intended vascular pathway. The reported incidence of extravasation among hospital inpatients varies between 0.1% and 6.5%, but true incidence is likely higher because of inconsistent documentation and under‐reporting.

We report on an 83‐year‐old male patient who was initiated on CaCl2 infusion (0.1 mM, at 10 mL/h) in cardiology ward because of low systolic blood pressure not responding to conventional therapy. Skin discolouration that ensued shortly after administration was ini- tially misinterpreted as soft tissue bruising in the context of his dis- tracting chest pain and anti‐platelet/coagulant status” Xu et al (2016).

Reference:

Xu, C., Turner, A., Yeoh, T.M. and Carney, B. (2016) Management of severe calcium chloride extravasation injury: a case report. ANZ Journal of Surgery. 86(5), p.421-2.

doi: 10.1111/ans.13437.

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