Gloves are not associated with adverse outcomes during paediatric cannulation

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“The present study shows that the use of protective gloves was not associated with adverse outcomes of clinical performance during paediatric cannulation.” Zhang et al (2014).

Reference:

Zhang, M., Lee, M. and Knott, S. (2014) Is clinical performance adversely affected by wearing gloves during paediatric peripheral intravenous cannulation? Emergency Medicine Australasia. August 22nd. [epub ahead of print].

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To investigate if wearing protective gloves during paediatric intravenous cannulation affects performance of the procedure.

METHODS: This was a prospective observational study. Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIVC) performed within the Paediatric ED was observed and recorded over a 12 month period. Data were compared between those clinicians wearing gloves and those not wearing gloves during PIVC.

RESULTS: One thousand and twenty paediatric cannulations were recorded during the observed period. The mean age of the children was 5.79 years. The overall success rate of cannulation was 86.18% and first attempt success rate 76.08%. Overall, gloves were used by 54.31% of clinicians to establish vascular access; glove use was lowest in the registrar group (41.11% compliance rate). The glove-wearing group had comparable overall success rate of 85.74% (475/554) to the no-gloves group of 86.70% (404/466). The difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Higher incidence of significant blood spillage during the procedure was observed among clinicians wearing no gloves (16.74%) in comparison with their glove-wearing counterparts (9.03%, P < 0.05). One needlestick injury was recorded in the present study period. There was no difference in blood culture contamination rate between glove-wearing group and no-gloves group (3.94% vs 3.76%, P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that the use of protective gloves was not associated with adverse outcomes of clinical performance during paediatric cannulation. The low compliance rate of gloves use is alarming, and many clinicians might be exposed to potential blood-borne infections. Clinicians should be encouraged and supported to use gloves for paediatric cannulation.

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