Extent of needleless connector blood contamination after routine flushing

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The aim of this study was to find the magnitude of blood contamination of PIV catheter hub after routine flushing” Krishnamurthy et al (2016).

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (PIV) are extensively used in sick neonates for administration of medicines and nutrition. When these PIVs are used on intermittent basis, they are flushed with saline in order to keep the hub of the catheter free from blood. Presence of blood in the hub of the catheter can be potentially dangerous as it could facilitate infection.

AIM: The aim of this study was to find the magnitude of blood contamination of PIV catheter hub after routine flushing.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We measured the volume of 24 g PIV by filling it with saline and thereby measuring its volume. The PIVs which were in situ for at least 6 hours and removed were used for this study. These catheters were flushed with 0.2 ml of saline and the RBC count was calculated.

RESULTS: A total of 94 PIVs were studied, out of which 84% showed blood tinged residual flush and 15% of them had visible blood clot. All (100%) of the catheter studied showed RBCs on microscopic examination. The median RBC count was 36960/cu mm and the interquartile range was 10000 – 113920/cu mm. The highest RBC count was 2080000/cu mm.

CONCLUSION: Blood contamination of the small bore PIVs after flushing is universal in neonates.

Full Text

Reference:

Krishnamurthy, V., Doreswamy, S.M. and Krishnagowda, S. (2016) Blood Contamination of the Small Bore Peripheral Intravenous Catheter in Neonates. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 10(11), p.EC05-EC07.

doi: 10.7860/JCDR/2016/20513.8841.

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